MRSA Superbug Forum

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MRSA
Started by Rebecca
Posted: July 29, 2007 at 20:06
my husband was diagnosed with MRSA, he underwent 50 days of IV therapy he was getting vancomycin. After his treatment has ended now he complains about headache, nausia, dizzyness, and he's always tired and sore, and he has moodswings now, he never had any of this before, and I can not find anything having to do with the long term effects of MRSA on the body can anyone tell me where to get this info?
Thank You IN advance
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Re: MRSA
Reply #1 by linda mccafferty
Posted: July 29, 2007 at 20:53
Dear Rebecca , so sorry to hear about your husband , on this site we call the after effects of mrsa "mrsa aftermath" as a lot of people are now reporting what your husband is going through . if you scroll down the threads you will see "after effects of mrsa on the body " the post was started by David . you will then be able to read the post's that many people who are suffering the way your husband is , medical profession are not addressing these issues . i hope reading this will help you and your husband . if you go to our website www.mrsaactionuk.net you will get a lot of information, help and support rebecca, and there is always someone here if you wish to talk about anything that is worrying you . my best wishes .
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Re: MRSA
Reply #2 by Nancy R
Posted: July 30, 2007
Unfortunately, much like chemo therapy, vancomycin and zyvox are simply very hard on the immune system. I would, if I were you, suggest to your husband that he add some vitamins and antioxidants to his diet. He probably has no reserve at this point and the body is struggling to catch up.


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Re: MRSA
Reply #3 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: July 30, 2007 at 07:42
My son was expected to die of MRSA bloodstream infection in the summer of 2003 aged 19. I am, therefore, speaking from direct personal observation and experience of nursing my son once he was discharged from hospital.

Despite the suggestion on another thread that there are many infections which do not need to be addressed by drugs, it is naive in the extreme to suggest that MRSA is one of those infections. It is bolleaux of the nth degree to suggest that the body is capable of clearing MRSA from the bloodstream without extremely toxic medication; the drugs used to clear MRSA infection are similar in effect to chemotherapy; chemotherapy works by almost poisoning the patient to death in an attempt to kill off the bugs. Indeed, given the rapidity with which MRSA takes hold, it is not hard to understand the need for such heavy dosages of such poisonous drugs.

Unfortunately,the after effects you describe are exactly the same as those experienced by my son. I am unable to decide whether this is a legacy of the infection or a side effects of the drug, however, suffice it to say that four years on there is still evidence of some of these problems. In addition, expert psychological evaluation has revealed trauma, the reach and extent of which is obviously an unknown factor.

Even after four years being MRSA free, headaches, nausea, moodswings, overwhelming tiredness, sore and aching joints, altered taste perception are still in evidence. I would say that it took almost three years for him to become 'well in himself', although these long term annoyances still persist. He was originally admitted with a dislocated knee and was on no medication and had no underlying weakness or illness of any kind. It is therefore a fact that the situation I describe is entirely the result of either MRSA infection or the drugs used to eradicate MRSA infection, rather than some other inherent or discrete reason.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #4 by Maria
Posted: July 30, 2007 at 17:03
My mum also had an aftermath from MRSA and I believe the vancomycin, she was a cancer patient and had been for 2 years. All the chemotherapy left its toll on her health, the vancomycin added to that.

She did eat sensibly and supplemented her diet with vitamins and probiotics. I think this does no harm, and many believe it is of benefit. She did what she could to try to make the best of the situation. But she did have the symptoms you and Ruth describe Rebecca.

Its about time some serious research was carried out on the aftermath of MRSA and its treatment, and something we are trying to push for.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #5 by Rebecca
Posted: July 30, 2007 at 22:14
Thank You all so much, and I am so sorry to read of your encounters with this horrible infection. I can only thank god that for now my husband is ok, and that his prognosis is good. Right now we are still on the 32 day waiting period. They tell us we have to wait for 32 days after his treatment ended, to see if he is going to break out again or not, and I pray to god that he does not. It was hard nursing him the 1st time, not only on him, but on myself and our 4 children as well.
It's still really odd to us, my husband has never been a "sick" person, never had health problems till this, and whats worse he contacted it from an apparent bug bite, or thats what they told us.
I will keep each and everyone of you in my prayers, for I know how this is. All I can do is pray.
They have told me my husband will not return to work, have any of you had to experince that? And if so why wont they let him go back? They have given us no clear answers to that even tho we have both asked numerous times.
And I so thank you all for being here this is such a help, I am so thankful that I found this site, now I dont have to cry alone.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #6 by Maria
Posted: July 31, 2007
Dear Rebecca
In terms of your husband returning to work it really depends on what his job is. If he is nauseus and dizzy he would not be able to operate machinery safely, or drive. If he works in a healthcare setting this may also affect his ability to return to work similarly any employment which involves food preparation may present problems.

It really does depend on his job and how quickly he recovers. I do hope he picks up soon as this is debilitating feeling like this, but there are folks on here who are battling on and are determined to make the best of things. Contrary to the popular press this does not only affect the elderly and infirm in this way, anyone who is perfectly fit and healthy and young who succumbs to MRSA may be affected by the aftermath. You just need to take one day at a time.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #7 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 08:29
Obviously, a legacy of nausea and dizziness is not a good attribute for a machine operator but why would there be a problem in working in food preparation if the infection has been eradicated and he has been pronounced clear? Similarly, in a healthcare setting? If the infection is cleared where is the problem?

I am just about to start writing a research paper about MRSA and its after effects but I have obviously lost the plot as I don't understand these comments at all.

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Re: MRSA
Reply #8 by Nancy R
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 09:07
When I was first diagnosed with MRSA after a hip replacement, I underwent months of Zyvox therapy and Cubin therapy. I was sick A LOT. I was going through PICC lines at the rate of every 2 weeks. My skin was breaking down from the wound cleaners and tape dressings used to secure the PICC. I has sweating all the time, running fevers and achy beyond words.

I added 5,000 mc of vitamin B12 (NO SHOT) under my tongue, 1,000 mg of vitamin C, a probiotic and Oreganol. The Oreganol was used to finally get rid of the thrush that was a result of being on antibiotics for so long.

Within 72 hours, I FELT much better. Frankly, I'd bury a dead rat under the back steps during a full moon if it would make me feel better. I helped me. I am, once again, on IV therapy hoping to finally get this infection eradicated so that yet another hip replacement can be installed. I feel better this time and no longer feel sick or exhausted.

MRSA takes everything from your body. Your immune system is on overdrive just trying to keep the bacteria in check. Certainly, you go through all of your reserves very quickly. I wouldn't recommend anything that didn't work for me. Its too costly as it is. These supplements gave me back quality of life. That has to account for something.

I also agree that when you are fighting HA-MRSA, you probably do need a good antibiotic. However, many people cannot tolerate the ones that work. I cannot tolerate vancomycin myself.

I still suggest adding some good vitamins to his diet. And, improve his diet, too. Fill him up with vitamin rich foods and high quality protein. You can't win this battle unless you go prepared. I'm in it to win it. So far, so good.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #9 by Si
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 10:13
I think to say any of the comments here are ‘bolleaux’ is a bit rash. I don’t see any comments that suggest anyone shouldn’t take antibiotics. Good diet is important. I know this is a discussion forum but rubbishing peoples opinions is not helpful.

I think with strict controls in the food industry being told you won’t have the all clear for 32 days, it would be reasonable to wait until you get the final all clear if this is where you work. And as for working in health and having the all clear – isn’t that what everyone here is crying out for – stricter control in the health environment?

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Re: MRSA
Reply #10 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 11:12
Probably one of the most knowledgeable people on this subject is Tony Field of MRSA Support. He has been struggling with the legacy of MRSA for over five years; I suggest giving him a ring on 0121 476 6583.

The concept of not being allowed to handle food or work in a healthcare setting even after eradication of MRSA puts MRSA survivors into an even greater bind and is very misleading. The general reason MRSA victims are unable to return to work is as a result of the physical damage caused by the infection, overwhelming tiredness and indescribable fatigue which takes hold, often accompanied by a blinding headache.

Comments such as 'but there are folks on here who are battling on and are determined to make the best of things' suggests that some people who have suffered MRSA are just sitting back and letting it all happen around them. It is difficult for anyone whose relative has sadly died from MRSA complications to understand the grinding repetitiveness of such lethargy after so many years and unfortunate that the suggestion has been mooted that even after eradication of the infection and having to deal with the physical after-effects there is some residual reason why personal tasks should not be entrusted to an erstwhile MRSA victim.

Anyway, as I say, give Tony a ring, he is extremely knowledgeable and speaks from a position of experience; his number is 0121 476 6583.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #11 by Si
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 12:20
To Ruth, I think your comments are misleading as you have taken other peoples comments out of context. Most of us who have survived come here to offer support to those asking for help. Those that are bereaved try to offer support in other ways. You have interpreted our comments in a very negative way. You are right, you appear to have lost the plot this time.

Rebecca, good luck I hope your husband gets his all clear and is well enough to return to work soon.

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Re: MRSA
Reply #12 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 12:49
Is it helpful in any way to suggest that there would be a problem in working in food preparation if the infection has been eradicated and he has been pronounced clear? Similarly in a healthcare setting? What are you saying? Even when pronounced clear the MRSA survivor poses a risk?

Where is the peer-reviewed evidence for this contention?

The obvious knock-on effect would be to question whether a recovered MRSA victim would be safe enough to make a sandwich for another person, or attend to a child's cut knee?

Obviously I also hope that Rebecca's husband is pronounced all clear, but his ability to return to work is coloured more by the physical limitations that MRSA and its eradication leave. Why whip up residual and unfounded fears that personal contact with food or in a healthcare setting could pose a risk to anyone else, even when pronounced clear?
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Re: MRSA
Reply #13 by Si
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 15:53
It would appear the only person whipping up fear here is you. No-one on this discussion thread has mentioned posing a risk to anyone if they are clear of the infection other than you.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #14 by Maria
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 17:14
Dear Rebecca
For clarification, your husband is fine preparing food etc just using good hand hygiene. I don’t know what industry he works in, but I do know that the food industry is highly regulated and if he didn’t have the all-clear then he would not be able to return.

If he was working in a healthcare setting he wouldn’t be restricted in this country. He would be in the Netherlands, healthcare workers are screened regularly, and are not kept in an environment with patients if they are found to be colonised with MRSA.

If anyone is pronounced clear then they would not pose a risk either in the food industry or a healthcare setting.

However, it is documented by the Health Protection Agency that Staphylococcus aureus can cause food poisoning, hence the importance of good hand hygiene. It is interesting to note that abattoirs and the food industry are more highly regulated than the healthcare setting.

And for further clarification my mum experienced overwhelming tiredness and indescribable fatigue, she was an active lively person before all this and her family had to witness these symptoms until she died. She did not survive but whilst she was still alive her resolve to beat these symptoms continued, she ate a healthy diet and remained positive and upbeat. She was in it to win it too. She had terminal cancer Rebecca, if it wasn’t for that and she was alive today I know she would have been like Nancy, and would have wanted to help to encourage people too. Always think of this when you have your low points, we have all been there.

My very best wishes to you and your family.

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Re: MRSA
Reply #15 by linda mccafferty
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 17:34
Dear ruth , i was very interested when i read your post 7, i am already half way through writing my research paper regarding the effects of MRSA . i became very interested on this last year with the thread that was started "after effects of MRSA on the body" i took a keen interest because my mother was infected and also my sister .
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Re: MRSA
Reply #16 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 18:02
Linda, how excellent. How far have you got? You must be in a good and knowledgeable position to refute some of the more bizarre contentions on this forum.

Reply #6 by Maria
Dear Rebecca
In terms of your husband returning to work it really depends on what his job is. If he is nauseus and dizzy he would not be able to operate machinery safely, or drive. If he works in a healthcare setting this may also affect his ability to return to work similarly any employment which involves food preparation may present problems.

Maria suggested an ongoing risk by being unclear in this post; that even after an all clear working with food preparation may be precluded. Why would this be unless there was an ongoing risk? Thank you for clarifying the exact position - there is no risk in food preparation from an ex-MRSA victim. This implies that once an all clear has been given, one can be comfortable in knowing that the infection has been cleared.

Maria has also clarified that working in a healthcare setting is precluded in certain countries if one is found to be colonised with MRSA; this is obviously very different from being infected with MRSA.

An empty gong sounding in the wind can be ignored but it is imperative when one occupies a position which commands belief and trust to be absolutely clear in what is posted.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #17 by lynn
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 19:03
rebecca i was also told a waiting time after the treatment had finished but it was 30 days. what is your husbands job?
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Re: MRSA
Reply #18 by Kelly
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 20:08
It is 3 clear tests for MRSA, and that can be over a longer period than 30 days. Even then it can lay undetected in your body. You may not be infectious but anyone can be colonised with MRSA at any time so it is always good to take precautions with hand washing and cleaning. Good luck with the research.
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Re: MRSA
Reply #19 by CFW
Posted: July 31, 2007 at 20:28
Re: MRSA
Reply #6 by Maria Posted: July 31, 2007
"Dear Rebecca
In terms of your husband returning to work it really depends on what his job is. If he is nauseus and dizzy he would not be able to operate machinery safely, or drive. If he works in a healthcare setting this may also affect his ability to return to work similarly any employment which involves food preparation may present problems.

It really does depend on his job and how quickly he recovers. I do hope he picks up soon as this is debilitating feeling like this, but there are folks on here who are battling on and are determined to make the best of things. Contrary to the popular press this does not only affect the elderly and infirm in this way, anyone who is perfectly fit and healthy and young who succumbs to MRSA may be affected by the aftermath. You just need to take one day at a time."

Lets have the whole posting rather than something taken out of context, and it was in response to a valid question where someone still hadn't got the all clear.

Empty vessels make moist noise.


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