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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #20 by Bev
Posted: May 12, 2006 at 17:10
reply#12 you are welcome Ruth its obvious 'mrsa' does'nt like a healthy debate mind you MRSA is not healthy subject full stop !

there is a real growing resistance to Teicoplanin as well now ~ even more scary is when you look at the costs to treat HAI's
even if we go off the 'official stats'
MRSA (bloodstream) average 7378 cases per annum @ at estimated cost 15546 per case
MSSA average 10500 cases per annum @ estimated cost 5545
C Diff averages 40,180 per annum @ estimated costs 3000 _ of course this does not include the additional costs where wards would have to close down because of an outbreak
but thats just the breakdown for 3 healthcare infections
(ref Abramson-MA et al Staphylococcus Aureus at what cost)

and yet the bacteria's are becoming more and more resistant to more and more antimicrobials which in the end would mean more and more cost
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #21 by Bev
Posted: May 12, 2006 at 17:48
i also meant to conclude that with the spiralling cost to treat these infections and the possibility that more and more resistance to meds are spiralling to my simple mind logic would therefore decree that to spend properly on infection control procedures ~ aseptic techniques, MORE cleaning staff per ratio patient and more nursing staff per ratio patient ~ this along with mandatory compliance that is strictly monitored would therefore mean less contractions therefore less cost ~ and also because there are less contractions there would be less need for prescribing therefore less resistance
but of course i am guessing my simple logic is really too simple and it would be far easier to keep throwing money at financial managers ~ sack the cleaners, the nurses, the docs just bring in management hit squads who can carry on jiggling the books, the figures and still saying the NHS has had its best year ever !!
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #22 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: May 12, 2006 at 17:55
Thank you ladies.

It should be remembered that when fighting a war, you should use your best weapons at the front for the benefit of all those who follow behind. My son is an anti-stereotypical MRSA victim - thankfully a survivor, albeit quite damaged - who, as such, has attracted a great deal of press attention. He is now 22, an extremely good looking, healthy, fit young man, constantly frustrated by the pain and damage caused by MRSA, which he contracted when he was 19, following successful surgery to repair a sports injury to his knee.

I am not averse to drawing attention to myself if I feel I have something useful to say as it is quite evident that the first person to make a real breakthrough in any campaign leads the way for those behind - common parlance 'a pioneer'. As a strategy it would be quite useless for those who may be able to impact on policy to shrink from speaking up for fear of being seen as 'out for themselves'.

If you have read any of the reports which show up under my name on a Google search, you will see that I spoke to each of the party leaders last year before the general election as part of the election campaign for both GMTV and the Daily Mirror; of course, my questions hinged on my son's experience but as this was the reason for my inclusion it could not have been otherwise. Linda has noted that I am 'straight to the point'; I can assure you that I was straight to the point with Mr. Blair and also John Reid when I was unfortunate enough to meet him in his role as Health Minister last January, also to discuss the problem of MRSA. You should deduce from this that each of the party leaders, especially those who are actually in a position to make the necessary changes, were left in absolutely no doubt whatsover that, in my opinion, which seemed to be endorsed by ITV and the Daily Mirror, not to mention any of the other newspapers which had published my son's story in connection with MRSA news over the previous year, my son was the very obvious figurehead of a campaign which involved many thousands of people.

Moreover, you should have noticed in the subsequent reports in the Observer in July that Mr. Blair and I corresponded on the lack of interest I found post-election regarding the List of Hidden Victims - those victims of MRSA who had died but, because of dubious accounting procedures, had managed to elude the net of statistics and therefore downplayed the extent of the problem. I used the opportunity of meeting Mr. Blair at Labour Party HQ of personally putting this list into his hands, stating that I was so glad that my son's name was not included but that I was handing it in on behalf of everyone whose relative's name did appear with a request that he give it special attention as it was a matter of great importance to more than the few the government statistics would have you believe. It would appear, however, that knowledge of the situation has not precipated action to address the situation.

If this is indicative of being 'all for myself', then I am guilty as charged.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #23 by Bev
Posted: May 12, 2006 at 20:45
to confirm ruth did indeed hand over the list of hidden victims to Mr Blair pre-election and he did say he would look into it ~ the list at that time was in its infancy ~ in November the ever growing list was handed over along with the Petition ~ and i continue todate adding more names of victims ~ it not only comprises of victims who have sadly died but sadly those who are deemed to have 'survived' but left with the legacy of the aftermath from which their lifes will never be the same ~ and that is why in a meeting with the BMA last month i asked for a patient study to be done on the aftermath of healthcare associated infections
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #24 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: May 13, 2006 at 08:10
Maybe 'MRSA' stating that I in it 'for myself' is the same person who spread similar slanderous rumours about me at the end of last summer?? I was shocked at the time I heard and withdrew from the general discussion for several months as a result.


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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #25 by linda mccafferty
Posted: May 13, 2006 at 15:43
Dear ruth , how awful,this has really stunned me ,i did notice you were not on as much, but then i have noticed a few people not been on either, im really sorry ruth for the treatment you have recieved, that is really well out of order, i for one are glad you are back,i do love your posts you are one of the many people who i admire on the site. to me you are a very strong woman who does not suffer fools gladly "THINK ABOUT THAT ONE RUTH"
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #26 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: May 13, 2006 at 17:55
Thank you Linda. You are obviously very perceptive (i) I am straight to the point (ii) I do not suffer fools gladly.
Maybe that is why someone spread rumours about me; jealousy is often the thief of reason.

I also was very stunned as I felt that James and I had laid a great deal of the groundwork in bringing MRSA to the notice of the public and especially to counter the claim that MRSA only happens to old and unwell patients - it does not, it can happen to anyone and, for those who survive, life is a great struggle, physically, financially, emotionally, and psychologically.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #27 by Peter
Posted: May 15, 2006 at 08:49
Hi Ruth,
I have just read your replies with interest and I am very interested in how you have bought this to the public front and the politicians.
As you like straight talking people and as I said earlier I am finding this debate a learning process. I hope you don't mind me asking a personal question regading your Son's infection.
Would it have made a difference to the outcome had your Son's infection been non MRSA i.e. "normal" Staff A. If yes can you please expnain how you feel this??
I hope you don't mind the question and I wish you and your Son my best wishes.
Regards
Peter

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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #28 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: May 15, 2006 at 09:30
http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/conditions/staph.html

Excerpt from the American Association for Clinical Chemistry

Infections caused by MRSA are frequently resistant to a wide variety of antibiotics and are associated with significantly higher rates of morbidity and mortality, higher costs, and longer hospital stays than infections caused by non-MRSA microorganisms.

I can explain it no better than a peer-reviewed article in a clinical journal.

Thank you for your good wishes.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #29 by Bev hurst
Posted: May 15, 2006 at 09:34
exactly Ruth ~ longer hospital stays and exceedingly higher costs
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #30 by lisa
Posted: May 15, 2006 at 21:39
Hi, I was just woundering is HA-MRSA the same as HA-staph infection, the only differance the MEDS.? My son recived a HA-infection after knee surgery, he has been in the hosp. for 6 surgeries so far to fix the damage that this infection did to him in one year, he had all the hardware and donors tissue removed, was on Vanc. for 4 1/2 mo.s and has sufferied dearley. I was told bt the doctor it was staph but everyone else calls it MRSA, the only truth I know is that it almost took his life and now has left him disabled at the age of 15 yrs. old.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #31 by Lisa
Posted: May 15, 2006 at 22:08
Hi,
I was woundering if HA-MRSA the same as a HA-INFECTION from a surgical site, the only differance the meds. the reason in my asking is, that my son recived a HA-INFECTION after knee surgery, he has had 6 surgeries so far to fix the damage that this infection caused, and is still waiting for another one, he was on vanc. for 4 1/2 mo.s had all the hardware and tissue removed and has sufferied dearley and also has been left permentally disabled. The doctor called it staph infection everyone else calls it MRSA, what I do know is that it came close to taking his life, the infection was not easy to treat, and it was hospital aqquried.My son was resistant to pennicillan, and two others.So my question is whats the differance besides the meds.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #32 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: May 16, 2006 at 07:24
http://www.labtestsonline.org/understanding/conditions/staph.html

HA-MRSA is HA-staph of the antibiotic-resistant type and therefore much harder to eradicate, it quite often kills or leaves disability in its wake. Ordinary staph can be treated with a variety of antibiotics and is unlikely to have any lasting effect. My son has been left in the same position as yours, following an episode exactly as you describe. It is particularly galling when watching a young, vibrant and previously very active young man stumbling around, in constant pain and very frustrated at his limited ability, to be then told that 'ordinary staph has the same symptoms and prognosis as MRSA' as was discussed earlier on this thread. I don't think so.

It is not surprising that the doctor has not mentioned MRSA, they would like you to think it's no big deal. I don't believe that either.

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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #33 by lisa
Posted: May 16, 2006 at 12:56
Hi Ruth,
It has been the hardest year of me life, watching like you say,my young boy stumble around, we have another new surgon (he is now out of state) and was hoping to set-up my son's 7th surgery last week for the ligaments and bonework, instead that doctor is sending him back to infectious deaise and I just pray that my worst fear won't happen again and that's the infection comming back.As far as the HA-INFECTION, I am stil confused, even after this amout of time. We have had attornies look at my son's records and nurses and they called it MRSA but at the time of all this,when we asked the ID. DR. and surgon they said it was HA-STAPH not MRSA.
Reading all the post here, I just wanted every one to know that wether it is HA-MRSA or HA-STAPH my child has been thru HELL and this was at the hands of the doctor, and my heart has just been breaking every day since this has happened!
THANKS for your reply.

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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #34 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: May 16, 2006 at 15:33
If it is an ordinary staph infection you should ask why it has caused so much damage and why anyone should think it is MRSA from reading the notes. Why use vancomycin on an ordinary staph infection?? Given that MRSA is resistant to many antibiotics and that the rise of HAIs generally is in part attributable to over-prescription of antibiotics, and given the general need to reduce unnecessary antibiotic consumption to a minimum, it is quite bizarre that any physician would, by choice, use a last-chance antibiotic against an infection which could be cleared by a less valuable treatment. Vancomycin is reserved for infections resistant to most other treatment. Therefore, I suspect that it is MRSA and that they are trying to keep it a secret. I would imagine that the notes state it is MRSA and the whole episode from start to finish is a mirror image of what happened to my son.

He had a fifth, and hopefully final, surgery in November. The prognosis was that the repair is as good as it can be, given the level of damage caused by MRSA within the knee and surrounding tissue, and the scarring caused by previous attempts to repair the damage left by MRSA. It is now a matter of building the knee up and encouraging it to bend and flex but this is a very slow and painful job. It is now almost three years since MRSA struck and not a day passes without him being in pain. The disability caused is evident 100% of the time and this is a young man hoping to earn a living in the sports world. Yes, it is absolutely heartbreaking and what is worse is the lack of understanding even among the medical profession of exactly the legacy left by MRSA; or maybe it is denial of the truth rather than a lack of understanding.

We found the preparations for the last surgery to be impeccable, all care was taken to ensure as infection-free an environment as possible but I do consider this likely to have been as a result of the hospital being aware that James and I were very vocal and very visible last year, entirely as a result of his MRSA infection and that I would have no hesitation in complaining loudly to the highest authority if I felt my son's health was at risk. However, this was all rather late as irreparable damage had already been caused.

You need a very committed and sympathetic physiotherapist to encourage your son to push himself, almost beyond endurance, to build his strength after the surgery. James' physio is so tough with him that he has been physically sick from the pain when in session with him but he feels this is worth it if it means he can kneel down again, run or walk more than 100 yards safely.

This is no now longer just a physical disability issue, it has now become a whole life issue and a whole family issue to the extent everyone is affected.

Best wishes.

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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #35 by EMMA
Posted: May 16, 2006 at 20:53
I WOULD LIKE TO SAY THAT IN SPRING 2000 I CONTRACTED MRSA SEPTACAEMIA AFTER HAVING A LARGE PART OF MY COLON REMOVED
I HAD A STAY IN ITC OF 99 DAYS MOST OF THAT TIME SEDATED AND PARALYSED BY DRUGS SO MEDICS COULD TRY AND SAVE MY LIFE. I HAD A TOTAL STAY IN HOSPITAL OF 6 MONTHS. I WAS OFF WORK FOR 5 YEARS AS HAD A LONG BATTLE TO GET FIT ONCE MORE, HOWEVER I HAVE ACHIEVED THAT NOW AND AM BACK AT FULL TIME WORK
I WOULD JUST LIKE TO SAY SASHA IF UR FAMILY MEMBER IS IN ITC THEN THATS THE BEST PLACE. MY LFE WAS INDEED SAVED BY THE STAFF IN TC, RUINED ON A DIRTY WARD BUT SAVED ON ITC. MY PRAYERS ARE WITH YOU IN THIS DIFFICULT TIME. YOU CAN AND WILL GET THROUGH THIS, HOWEVER YOU HAVE A BATTLE ON YOUR HANDS TOO
TAKE CARE
EMMA
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #36 by jacqui
Posted: January 28, 2007 at 21:50
My Mum is in hospital. She is 86and 16 years ago had a hind quarter amputation. Mum has diarrhoea, and we have now been told, MRSA in the urine, nose, throat, and bed sores. My son has given the Hospital dressings containing silver for her bedsores. What should we expect from the Hospital now?
She was in Hospital before Christmas and released too early so there were letters of complaint. However, the care has been better this time BUT she has contracted MRSA. What can we do? Is there anything we can do? She is also jaundiced and at last, the Hospital seems to be taking notice.
Thankls for any help you can give.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #37 by Serena
Posted: June 11, 2012 at 03:29
I am just the parent of a young Marine currently hospitalized with a mrsa staph infection in his bloodstream. He has been treated for 2 days with IV antibiotics, and is still very sick. I assumed this was normal, and that he will be fine in a day or so. Just started searching for more info and your debate (which seems to be between medical professionals) is pretty scary. Do the majority of patients recover, or not?

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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #38 by Suz
Posted: July 9, 2012 at 01:22
Bev:
While I agree about the 'overprescribing' of antibiotics; one of the
issues with an actual MRSA case, is not necessarily that of over-
prescribing - but of the strain that is contracted. There are many
cases of people who did not take (or VERY rarely took) antibiotics,
before contracting MRSA. Another issue is that (of course, depending
upon the severity of the case) one of the after effects, itself, can
be that the patient's weakened system can develop allergies to
antibiotics that they took without any problem, beforehand - which
adds to the inability to heal...or an outright reaction. This is
especially true of someone whose case has progressed to the
bloodstream. At that point, it becomes an entirely 'different monster'
and changes the outcome, considerably (not always in ways that can be
anticipated).

Sasha:
If it is any consolation...I am living proof that you CAN survive,
even though mine was in my bloodstream and the doctors have NO CLUE as
to how I managed to live through their blundering, misdiagnoses and
inability to figure out what to do (some of us got this before it was
'a known entity'). Prayers for your brother-in-law - and please help
educate family and friends to be patient and understanding with him -
he has a very hard road ahead of him :(.
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Re: mrsa in bloodstream
Reply #39 by mike
Posted: April 26, 2013
my dad is 75 and has mmsa in the blood stream ,is there diffrent types mrsa infections u can get in the blood or just one the one ??
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